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Diesel drop threatens EU's CO2 gains

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Demand for diesel is declining so much in Germany that the country is likely to have its first rise in average annual CO2 output by its new-car fleet since 1997, says VDIK, the German car importers association.

The diesel penetration rate in Germany has dropped from nearly half of new-car sales recently to no more than 41% last March. That drop is due to scandals and scares – Dieselgate and the resulting wave of cities banning heavily-polluting vehicles, often including diesels. 

VDIK said the average was 127.6 grams of CO per km for January to May this year, versus 127.0 g/km for the same period last year. If this trend continues in the second half of this year, 2017 will have a higher average than 2016.

This would confirm the concern voiced by many OEMs that sharp reductions in diesel sales would be compensated by petrol cars, thus leading to a reversal of the gains in CO2 emissions reduction – the EU target is 95g/km from 2020.

Overall CO2 reduction across the EU had already slowed to 1.4 g/km last year, due in large part to the slowing sales of diesels, which are up to 20% more fuel-efficient than petrol cars, and the rising popularity of SUVs. 

Image: public domain

 

Sunday, July 16, 2017 - 11:15Frank JacobsGreen and SafetyEurope
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