Features
6 Jun 18

New electric charge point operator targets UK

A Swedish electric vehicle charge point operator has unveiled bold plans to become a leading charging infrastructure company in north west Europe within the next five years.

Vattenfall announced its amibition as it launched InCharge to the British electric vehicle charging market this month. The company currently operates 9,000 charging points in Sweden, the Netherlands and Germany.

The company will invest SEK 3 billion (€300 million) to develop develop new businesses, including charging infrastructure and battery storage.

Magnus Hall, Vattenfall’s president and chief executive officer, said, “Vattenfall strongly believes that the best way to make transport fossil free in a generation is to go electric. That’s why we are rolling out our charging network InCharge across north western Europe. We are in Britain to grow, and GB’s electric vehicle ambitions are a perfect fit with our smart, digitalised and low carbon electric vehicle strategy.”

Looking for partners

The company is looking for commercial developers, real-estate companies, industries, fleet owners and local authorities to partner with InCharge for the installation of charging points around Britain.

Businesses have flexibility in whom they let use InCharge charge points installed in office car parks. The points can be kept private for company car and van drivers, opened to all employees, or even made available to the public as a revenue generating exercise.

The charge point owners set the prices for the electricity they supply, and users are billed via an InCharge charge card or charge tag. Prices are detailed on InCharge’s app and website.

Tomas Björnsson, head of Vattenfall E-mobility, said, “The combination of Vattenfall’s investment plans and smart solutions for home, office and destination charging will boost confidence in the young British EV market, increase competition, help tackle drivers’ range anxiety, support clean air zones in Britain’s cities and ultimately bring down cost to British drivers.”

Authored by: Jonathan Manning